ERI Economic Research Institute

B2B Website Redesign

Background

ERI Economic Research Institute was founded over 25 years ago to provide compensation applications for private and public organizations. We provide businesses with access to salary survey and cost of living data. Subscribers include corporate compensation, relocation, human resources, and other professionals, as well as independent consultants and counselors, and US and Canadian public sector administrators (including military, law enforcement, city/county, state/provincial, and federal government pay administrators).

My Role

I was given the duty of redesigning the ERI website to improve the user experience and increasing conversion rates. I am the only designer so I am tasked with doing both research, planning, and strategizing the direction of the newly designed website.

Please be aware that due to my NDA, I cannot disclose the full details of the project. I am also still currently working on the redesign so no actual development time has been placed into the project yet.

Research

As the solo UX Designer for the project, I needed to first understand both the business and user needs. I started by interviewing stakeholders. From the interviews, I pieced together the information needed to create my personas. These personas were then given to the marketing team to help me come up with the copy that would be going on each page. We decided the best tone for the website would be a conversational one to invoke the emotions we were aiming for with our users.

The next step of the research phase was to contact our current subscribers to try to understand their pain points and why they decided to choose ERI. I wanted to learn what worked on them and what didn't so I could establish a foundation on what the new redesign would be based on.

User flow chart to visualize the different sets of users and the potential paths they would take navigating the website



Planning

As the solo UX Designer for the project, I needed to first understand both the business and user needs. I started by interviewing stakeholders. From the interviews, I pieced together the information needed to create my personas. These personas were then given to the marketing team to help me come up with the copy that would be going on each page. We decided the best tone for the website would be a conversational one to invoke the emotions we were aiming for with our users.

The next step of the research phase was to contact our current subscribers to try to understand their pain points and why they decided to choose ERI. I wanted to learn what worked on them and what didn't so I could establish a foundation on what the new redesign would be based on. I also reached out to leads who weren't yet subscribers to ask them what they were looking for in a compensation software and to find out what questions they had that weren't being resolved on our website.

After the interviews with both users and stakeholders, I created a user flow chart (see above) to visualize how users were getting to the website. This is crucial because there are different paths users can take to arrive on the website and each of them represented a different step of the "Buyer's Stage". Users who came from pay-per-click are different from those who come directly to the ERI homepage as they have no information on the ERI products. I had to make sure that the content for each of paths taken clearly addressed the different questions and needs the user may have.

I start with sketching out wireframes with a pen and paper so I can rapidly create different design patterns